Could Wal-Mart thinking improve healthcare?

Wal-Mart revolutionized the way we shop by making America’s retail trade system more cost-efficient. Could it do the same with our dysfunctional health care system?

That’s a big question being asked these days at the headquarters of the world’s largest retailer.

One of the bright minds trying to answer it belongs to Marcus Osborne, 32, a Transylvania University graduate from Frankfort.

The way Osborne and other Wal-Mart executives are thinking about that question has huge implications.

Rising health care costs stung Wal-Mart several years ago when critics pointed out that many of its workers were on public assistance because they didn’t have health insurance. Rather than keep trying to avoid rising healthcare costs, Wal-Mart decided to attack them.

The company revamped its insurance plans to cover more employees. The company says nearly 93 percent of its workers now have health insurance, more than half of them through Wal-Mart.

Wal-Mart also began launching initiatives to cut health care costs for customers. It started selling hundreds of generic prescriptions for $4, forcing other retailers to do the same. It started a chain of in-store medical clinics, which it hopes to have in 400 stores by 2010. In those clinics, nurse practitioners from local hospitals will provide basic medical services, and Wal-Mart will design and manage the business systems behind them.

Those ventures could be just the beginning.

“We’re looking at things like how could we work with providers to increase productivity, increase efficiency,” said Osborne, who joined Wal-Mart last June and is now senior director of business development/healthcare.

Other initiatives that Wal-Mart CEO Lee Scott has talked about include contracting with other U.S. companies to help manage how they process and pay prescription claims. Wal-Mart also is promoting the use of electronic health records and prescriptions, which Scott says would improve quality and safety while driving down costs.

Fixing inefficiency

“I’m personally amazed by the sheer inefficiency in the (American health care) system,” Osborne said. “I’m amazed by the lack of transparency, particularly to the customer. With all the political, business and social rhetoric around the need for change in the health care industry, I’m just astounded how little change is occurring.”

Wal-Mart doesn’t seem to be looking for big profits in health care. Rather, it wants to protect its core business. If customers can spend less on health care, they’ll have more to spend on the zillions of products Wal-Mart stores sell.

The company is looking for market solutions to rising health care costs, as opposed to government solutions, which Osborne also knows something about. After graduating from Transylvania in 1996, he worked in the White House for Clinton adviser Ira Magaziner and his public policy team. The team was then working on Internet policy, having just flamed out in its controversial effort to reform health care.

“I learned a lot from their pain,” Osborne said.

After leaving the White House, Osborne worked as a corporate consultant and earned an MBA at Harvard University. What led him to Wal-Mart were the opportunities he saw in both the company’s huge size and its innovative corporate culture.

“It strikes me as one of the few entities around capable and willing to take the action necessary to deliver meaningful change,” Osborne said.

Wal-Mart has been successful — and often controversial — because it knows what it does well and how to make the most of it. It creates efficiencies by squeezing costs, streamlining systems and giving customers what they want at the cheapest possible price.

Osborne thinks the problem with American health care is that companies and whole industries profit by exploiting inefficiencies in the system. That leaves little incentive to make the system efficient.

Lessons for Kentucky

That sounds a lot like Kentucky, where some people have prospered for generations by exploiting the inefficiencies of a small state with 120 counties and even more school districts.

And it makes you wonder: What could Kentucky learn from Wal-Mart? What core strengths could Kentucky government and industry leverage to solve health care problems and maybe even grow the economy?

Osborne notes that parts of Kentucky have an excellent health care infrastructure, yet the state overall has huge problems with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, poor dental health and substance abuse.

“Are there opportunities in business to actually create solutions from a wellness point of view?” he wondered. “Is there some way to make a business out of engaging people to take action?”

As it happens, Osborne’s wife, Cara, is part of one such Kentucky effort.

The 28-year-old Grayson native, who graduated from Transylvania and earned a doctorate in public health from Harvard, works from their home in Arkansas as a professor in the distance learning program of Frontier Nursing Service. The Hyden-based service is one of the nation’s largest trainers of nurse practitioners and midwives.

Whatever Wal-Mart does has a big impact. It is Kentucky’s largest private employer, with nearly 32,000 workers at 99 stores and two distribution centers. Wal-Mart’s approaches also could serve as models for other Kentucky companies, as well as government agencies, non-profits and entrepreneurs.

Like Wal-Mart, Kentucky must face up to some tough issues it has always preferred to avoid. If we are ever to improve health care in Kentucky, we must squeeze out unnecessary costs, invest wisely and encourage creative thinking by our brightest minds — minds like the Osbornes, the Kentuckians who now live in Arkansas.

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to “Could Wal-Mart thinking improve healthcare?”

  1.   Sue Says:

    Although i can appreciate different perceptions and ideations regarding the ever chaotic healthcare system i find it disturbing that to equate what is under the guise of creating a proactive atmosphere as cited is being done by Wal Mart is realistically a strategy to gain greater financial earnings for the corporation. There does not seem to be an apparent focus on the human factor other than what was implemented due to strong encouragement by outside sources; i.e. employees receiving state aided supplements to survive. Rather it is another ruse to remain undaunted by the needs of those who without their involvement the business would not exist. The apathy is apalling not only for companies such as Wal Mart, it is the very antithesis of what our society views as the priority, the bottom line so to speak money not living souls.

    Why are not proactive, preventive wellness measures being incorporated as a means of offsetting costs if the focus is truly on the welfare of those involved. It would certainly be more cost effective.

  2.   Todd Says:

    What Sue wrote makes my brain hurt. Can anyone translate?

  3.   Jeff Hess Says:

    Shalom Tom,

    Could Wal-Mart thinking improve health care? Of course it could.

    Is it likely to do so? No.

    No corporation can improve health care because that’s not what corporations do. Corporations are only able to create shareholder value and no action can be taken that doesnt’ work towards that goal without risking the ire of shareholders.

    Every action Wal-Mart, or any corporation, takes that seems to improve health care benefits or help the environment is driven only by the prime directive to make money for its shareholders.

    For some background on what Wal-Mart has done in health care, take a look at:

    http://thewritingonthewal.net/?cat=79

    B’shalolm,

    Jeff Hess

  4.   » Update: Healthcare, Wal-Mart and a Kentuckian The Bluegrass and Beyond Says:

    [...] of the first pieces I wrote after beginning this column nearly a year ago was about Marcus Osborne, a Frankfort native and Transylvania University graduate, who is now a senior executive at Wal-Mart [...]