Civil War general’s home featured on annual Bourbon County tour

September 29, 2015
Historic Paris-Bourbon County's annual home tour Oct. 4 visits Houston Dale on Ford's Mill Road near Paris, a circa 1840 house that was the birthplace and boyhood home of John T. Croxton, who broke with his slaveholding family and became a Union general during the Civil War. Photos by Tom Eblen

Historic Paris-Bourbon County’s annual home tour Oct. 4 visits Houston Dale on Ford’s Mill Road near Paris, a circa 1840 house that was the birthplace and boyhood home of John T. Croxton, who broke with his slaveholding family and became a Union general during the Civil War. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

PARIS — This year’s Historic Paris-Bourbon County house tour Sunday is at the boyhood home of one of Kentucky’s most-interesting and least-known Civil War generals, who ended his short life as an American diplomat in South America.

Nobody is sure when the Greek Revival mansion called Houston Dale was built. The best guess is around 1840, when the farm belonged to Henry Croxton, the son of a wealthy Virginia planter, and his wife, Ann.

For the past 36 years, Houston Dale has been the home of Thoroughbred breeder Phil T. Owens, who restored and added onto the mansion just west of the Paris bypass.

While building Houston Dale, the Croxtons probably lived in a circa 1790s log cabin now restored behind the mansion. The couple would have needed more room: they eventually had 12 children. They also had 20 slaves to work their farm.

John Thomas Croxton

John Thomas Croxton

Slavery was a subject of disagreement between Croxton and his eldest son, John Thomas Croxton, who was born in 1836 and went off to Yale in 1854. They argued about it in letters, with the younger Croxton explaining that he favored the gradual emancipation and deportation of slaves.

Anti-slavery views were not popular among white people in Bourbon County then. Nearly half the population was enslaved blacks, whose labor produced a rich agricultural bounty for their owners.

After graduating from Yale and earning a law degree from Georgetown, Croxton returned to Paris in 1859 to practice law. The next year, he was one of only two men in Paris to vote for the Republican presidential candidate, Abraham Lincoln.

Lincoln’s election sparked the Civil War, and Croxton was quick to join the Union cause. He recruited troops for the 4th Kentucky Infantry, of which he was elected lieutenant colonel.

Over the next five years, Croxton’s superiors repeatedly praised him as a skilled and fearless officer who fought despite several battle wounds. He was promoted to colonel at age 24, brigadier general at 27 and given an honorary promotion to major general for gallantry

Croxton saw action at many battles, including Perryville, Chickamauga, Nashville and Atlanta. He led a daring raid across Alabama that captured Tuscaloosa and eliminated one of the Confederacy’s last supply centers. After the war, he spent a year as military commander of central Georgia.

In 1866, Croxton returned to Paris, where he had built a house on Cypress Street. He practiced law, farmed, chaired the state Republican party and helped start a Republican newspaper, the Louisville Commercial.

President Ulysses S. Grant appointed Croxton as the United States minister to Bolivia. But a year after taking the post in 1873, he died in La Paz of tuberculosis at age 37. He is buried in Paris Cemetery.

After Croxton’s death, Houston Dale was owned for many years by James Hall, a prominent farmer.

In 1979, Owens was planning to buy a horse farm and build a new “old” house. He had just gone to Colonial Williamsburg to study traditional architecture when his father told him Houston Dale was for sale. He bought it.

Owens renovated the mansion, which has foot-thick brick walls and most of its original floors and woodwork. He added a wing to each side for additional space and bathrooms. Owens also restored the log cabin, where his mother lives.

He also built a swimming pool, a pool house and a garage with an apartment that looks more like a colonial-style guest house from the front.

Between the mansion and Houston Creek is a stone wall along what appears to be an old road. Built into the wall with big limestone slabs are steps and a platform, apparently for stepping out of a carriage or stage coach.

Owens and his wife, Michelle, recently put the 9,665-square foot house and surrounding 31 acres on the market for $1,675,000. She said they want less house and more land to expand their broodmare stock and run cattle.

“It will be hard to leave,” Owens said of Houston Dale, recalling the first time the late Lexington horseman and philanthropist W.T. Young Jr. visited.

“He said, ‘If I lived here, I’d never leave home,'” Owens said. “It is a special house.”

If you go

Historic Home Tour

When: 2 p.m. — 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4

Where: Houston Dale Farm, 2328 Fords Mill Rd.

Why: Annual benefit for the preservation group Historic Paris-Bourbon County.

Cost: $10 members, $15 public. Children younger than 17 free.

More info: (859) 987-7274 or Hopewellmusuem.org.

 

Historic Paris-Bourbon County's annual home tour Oct. 4 visits Houston Dale on Ford's Mill Road near Paris, a circa 1840 house that was the birthplace and boyhood home of John T. Croxton, who broke with his slaveholding family and became a Union general during the Civil War. Since the late 1970s, the house has belonged to Thoroughbred breeder Phil Owens. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Thoroughbred breeder Phil Owens bought the house in 1979 and renovated it.

 

Historic Paris-Bourbon County's annual home tour Oct. 4 visits Houston Dale on Ford's Mill Road near Paris, a circa 1840 house that was the birthplace and boyhood home of John T. Croxton, who broke with his slaveholding family and became a Union general during the Civil War. Since the late 1970s, the house has belonged to Thoroughbred breeder Phil Owens. This is the dining room. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

The dining room at Houston Dale includes original woodwork.

 

Phil and Michelle Owens and the youngest of their three children, Jack, 4, pose in the dining room of Houston Dale, their circa 1840 house near Paris. The house was the birthplace and boyhood home of John T. Croxton, who broke with his slaveholding family and became a Union general during the Civil War. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Phil and Michelle Owens and the youngest of their three children, Jack, 4, pose in the dining room of Houston Dale, their circa 1840 house near Paris.

 

Historic Paris-Bourbon County's annual home tour Oct. 4 visits Houston Dale on Ford's Mill Road near Paris, a circa 1840 house that was the birthplace and boyhood home of John T. Croxton, who broke with his slaveholding family and became a Union general during the Civil War. Since the late 1970s, the house has belonged to Thoroughbred breeder Phil Owens. This is a dining area in the kitchen, which features an original stone fireplace. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

This is a dining area in the kitchen, which features an original stone fireplace.

 

Steps and a landing to help passengers get on and off carriages and stage coaches was built into a stone wall beside Houston Dale, site of Historic Paris-Bourbon County's annual home tour Oct. 4. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Steps and a landing to help passengers get on and off carriages and stage coaches was built into a stone wall beside Houston Dale.

 

Historic Paris-Bourbon County's annual home tour Oct. 4 visits Houston Dale on Ford's Mill Road near Paris, a circa 1840 house that was the birthplace and boyhood home of John T. Croxton, who broke with his slaveholding family and became a Union general during the Civil War. Since the late 1970s, the house has belonged to Thoroughbred breeder Phil Owens. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Houston Dale was the boyhood home of Union Gen. John T. Croxton.

 

Historic Paris-Bourbon County's annual home tour Oct. 4 visits Houston Dale on Ford's Mill Road near Paris, a circa 1840 house that was the birthplace and boyhood home of John T. Croxton, who broke with his slaveholding family and became a Union general during the Civil War. Since the late 1970s, the house has belonged to Thoroughbred breeder Phil Owens. He built the back of the garage, which faces the house, to look like a guest house. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Owens built the back of the garage, which faces the house, to look like a guest house.

 

Historic Paris-Bourbon County's annual home tour Oct. 4 visits Houston Dale on Ford's Mill Road near Paris, a circa 1840 house that was the birthplace and boyhood home of John T. Croxton, who broke with his slaveholding family and became a Union general during the Civil War. Since the late 1970s, the house has belonged to Thoroughbred breeder Phil Owens. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

The dining room at Houston Dale.


Paris Independent Schools celebrate 150 years of small-town pride

September 15, 2015
Kenney Roseberry, 92, asked her 9-year-old twin great-granddaughters, Kitty and Annie Berry, to guess the identity of the lady pictured in an old Paris High School yearbook. It was her as an English teacher in the 1960s. Roseberry graduated from Paris High and taught there for 35 years. Larry Shelt looked on at left. Photos by Tom Eblen

Kenney Roseberry, 92, asked her 9-year-old twin great-granddaughters, Kitty and Annie Berry, to guess the identity of the lady pictured in an old Paris High School yearbook. It was her as an English teacher in the 1960s. Roseberry graduated from Paris High and taught there for 35 years. Larry Shelt looked on at left. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

PARIS — For a century and a half, people here have been true to their schools.

The devotion is apparent in a new exhibit celebrating the 150th anniversary of Paris Independent Schools that will be up through Oct. 11 at the Hopewell Museum, 800 Pleasant Street. (More information: Hopewellmuseum.org.)

“We started reaching out to folks for memorabilia, and the community stepped up,” Superintendent Gary Wiseman said at an opening reception Sunday afternoon that attracted dozens of alumni.

“Paris High was a fantastic school,” said Hank Everman, a 1959 graduate who before retirement was a history professor at Eastern Kentucky University. “My history teacher, Helen Hunter, was better than any professor I had in college.”

Everman, whose books include a two-volume history of Bourbon County, said Paris Independent Schools have enjoyed both academic and athletic success.

Famous graduates include statesman and education advocate Edward Prichard; college and professional football coaches Blanton Collier and Bill Arnsparger; Basil Hayden, the University of Kentucky’s first All-American basketball player; and Donna Hazzard, the first Kentucky woman to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy.

“With an independent school district, you get much more of a family feel and community involvement,” said Jami Dailey, the principal of Paris High.

Paris’ first public school opened Sept. 11, 1865, soon after a Union Army hospital vacated the Bourbon Academy building, which had been a private school before the Civil War. The new public school began with three teachers, 130 students and a curriculum that included Greek and Latin.

Paris created a public school for black children in the 1870s, a time when many districts ignored them. By the 1890s, Paris Western was one of the few black public high schools in Kentucky. The district also was early to offer night classes for laborers, both black and white, and agriculture extension classes for farmers.

When Lee Kirkpatrick was superintendent in the 1920s, he paid top-dollar for teachers. The result was one of the best-educated high school faculties in Kentucky, Everman said. Many Paris students went on to success at Ivy League colleges, including Prichard, a graduate of Princeton and Harvard Law.

The greyhound was chosen as the high school’s mascot in the 1920s. The school colors of orange and black were said to have been inspired by the racing silks of Claiborne Farm when owner Arthur B. Hancock was chairman of the school board.

This professionally curated exhibit in one of Kentucky’s best local museums showcases the school system’s successes, including peaceful desegregation in 1964. There are many old photos, trophies, uniforms and other memorabilia.

Paris is one of 53 independent school districts left in Kentucky. Economics and the perceived advantages of school consolidation have prompted many other independents to merge into larger countywide school systems in recent decades.

Paris has always resisted the trend, despite a small enrollment. The elementary, middle and high schools have fewer than 700 students, including 204 in the high school. The surrounding Bourbon County school system is four-times larger.

Changes in the economy and its effect on city residents have been a challenge. Paris has more poor and minority students than the county system: 80 percent are eligible for free or reduced lunch, 18 percent are black and 17 percent are Hispanic.

Paris schools have a new curriculum to try to boost lagging test scores, Wiseman said. Paris High students this fall were issued laptop computers for the first time.

“I think we have some things in place that will pay off,” he said. “We’re trying to help overcome a lot of the challenges our families face.”

Paris schools remain financially sound, Wiseman said, and the school board is committed to remaining independent, in part because of the system’s rich heritage.

“City schools have been good for the community,” said Kenney Roseberry, who graduated from Paris High and then was an English teacher there for 35 years before retiring in 1982. Now 92, she has two great-granddaughters in the system.

Many years ago, Roseberry said, she and other members of the League of Women Voters studied the school system and recommended that it be consolidated with Bourbon County.

“Fortunately,” she said, “nobody paid any attention to us.”

 

Norma Adair, a 1939 graduate of Paris High School, talked with Ron Carter.

Norma Adair, a 1939 graduate of Paris High School, talked with Ron Carter at the opening of an exhibit honoring the school district’s 150th anniversary.

 

Old photos of cheerleaders from Paris High School and Western High School, which was closed when it merged with Paris High in 1964 as part of peaceful desegregation. The photos are part of an exhibit at the Hopewell Museum in Paris marking the 150th anniversary of Paris Independent Schools.

Old photos of cheerleaders from Paris High School and Western High School, which was closed when it merged with Paris High in 1964 as part of peaceful desegregation.

 

Gary Wiseman, left, superintendent of Paris Independent Schools, chatted with Lindrell Blackwell, a 1981 graduate of Paris High School, at the Hopewell Museum on Sunday at the opening of an exhibit honoring the school district's 150th anniversary.

Gary Wiseman, left, superintendent of Paris Independent Schools, chatted with Lindrell Blackwell, a 1981 graduate of Paris High School, at the Hopewell Museum on Sunday at the opening of an exhibit honoring the school district’s 150th anniversary.

 

The Hopewell Museum exhibit honoring Paris Independent Schools' 150th anniversary pays tribute to former band director Tom Siwicki.

The Hopewell Museum exhibit honoring Paris Independent Schools’ 150th anniversary pays tribute to former band director Tom Siwicki.


Bequest allowed family to restore its circa 1841 ancestral home

May 26, 2015
The entry hall at Buknore.  Originally named Locust Grove, it was designed and built by Matthew Kennedy of Lexington, Kentucky's first professional architect. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

The entry hall at Buknore. Originally named Locust Grove, it was designed and built by Matthew Kennedy of Lexington, Kentucky’s first professional architect. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

PARIS — Some families dream of still having the “old homestead” — a place where many generations could gather for holidays and special occasions to keep in touch with each other and their shared heritage.

Walker Buckner’s descendants have always had such a place, hidden within more than 1,000 acres of rolling Bourbon County farmland.

Buknore is one of Kentucky’s most beautiful Antebellum mansions, especially after a recent renovation made possible by a relative’s generous bequest and the talents of several family members and their contractors.

The house will be open for a rare public tour Sunday at the Summer Box Supper benefitting the preservation group Historic Paris-Bourbon County. The event is sold out.

“We feel so fortunate and blessed that we still have this house,” said Susan Combs of Lexington, one of seven cousins in the Buckner-Hinkle family’s sixth generation. “It was where we would go to be with our grandmother. It was something each of our parents loved so much and they kept that love alive.”

Buknore, originally called Locust Grove, was completed in 1841 for Walker Buckner (1781-1855). He came from Virginia with two brothers who also built mansions in Bourbon County.

The master builder was Matthew Kennedy, Kentucky’s first professional architect. Buknore bears his signature style: four large, two-story pilasters across the front of the house topped by a pediment with a half-round window.

Kennedy — or, perhaps in a couple of cases, his imitators — built several similar Federal-style houses in Central Kentucky. Other notable examples include Auvergne (1837) in Bourbon County; Grassland (1823) on Shelby Lane in Fayette County; and Kennedy’s own home (1813) on North Limestone at Constitution Street in Lexington, which now houses the shop Mulberry & Lime.

Buknore is one of Kennedy’s later houses and its interior woodwork reflects the Greek Revival style that became popular in the 1830s. Built a mile off Cane Ridge Road, the house has always been in the family and never suffered serious neglect.

Still, the mansion needed a lot of work, both structurally and cosmetically.

“The last time it had really been renovated was, I guess, my great-grandmother in the 1880s,” Combs said. “And it felt like the 1880s. You couldn’t sit on the furniture.”

Nancy Hinkle Holland, a Lexington physician, realized that, too. She had no children, and when she died in 2010 at age 88, she left a substantial sum for Buknore’s preservation and upkeep. The house is owned by Hinkle Family Properties.

That bequest enabled the family to do a top-to-bottom renovation, which was just completed. It included new wiring, plumbing, structural and foundation work. Later additions were removed, an original stone back porch was repaired and all of the brick was cleaned and re-pointed. Original green ash floors were restored. Some furniture that has been in the house for generations was refinished.

The old, separate kitchen was converted into an apartment and connected to the main house with a living and dining wing. A new kitchen was added between it and the formal dining room.

Playing big roles in the project were Combs and two other family members: Sally Brown Thilman, an interior designer in Chicago, and Estill Curtis Pennington of Paris, a noted art historian, scholar and author.

The professional team included project manager Ronald Little of Coppinger & Associates and architects Charles Jolly and Carol Myers, all of Lexington.

“I think we got the wonderful result we did because we had such a great team,” Thilman said. “From a design perspective, our goal was to respect the past and bring it into the present in certain ways, like building a new kitchen.”

Combs, Thilman and Pennington worked closely with their relatives to try to achieve consensus on most major issues. That mainly involved the sixth generation, all of whom live in Central Kentucky. But it also included 18 members of the seventh generation, who are scattered from New York to Portland, Ore.

The family now keeps a Google calendar to track who is using the house when. The entire family will gather at Buknore on major holidays.

“We’re just trying to take care of what we’ve been given, but also keep the family together,” Combs said. “Luckily we all get along pretty well. If we didn’t, this project would have been a lot harder.”

The entry hall of Buknore in Bourbon County. It was designed and built circa 1834-1841 by Matthew Kennedy of Lexington, Kentucky's first professional architect. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

The entry hall of Buknore in Bourbon County.

The entry hall of Buknore, looking into the dining room.  It was designed and built circa 1834-1841 by Matthew Kennedy of Lexington, Kentucky's first professional architect. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

The entry hall of Buknore, looking into the dining room.

The former farm office room at Buknore has been converted into a bedroom. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

The former farm office room at Buknore has been converted into a bedroom.

The dining room at Buknore. Much of the furniture has been in the Bourbon County house for generations. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

The dining room at Buknore. Much of the furniture has been in the house for generations.

Buknore in Bourbon County was built by Walker Buckner between 1834 and 1841. Originally named Locust Grove, it was designed and built by Matthew Kennedy of Lexington, Kentucky's first professional architect. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Buknore in Bourbon County was built by Walker Buckner between 1834 and 1841.

Buknore in Bourbon County was built by Walker Buckner between 1834 and 1841. Originally named Locust Grove, it was designed and built by Matthew Kennedy of Lexington, Kentucky's first professional architect. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Buknore in Bourbon County was built by Walker Buckner between 1834 and 1841.


Bourbon tour town’s founders escaped years of Indian captivity

September 30, 2014

140922RuddlesMills0064Philip and Michele Foley on the porch of their house in Ruddles Mill, which was built in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. It will be open for tours Sunday. Photos by Tom Eblen 

 

RUDDLES MILL — Since Philip and Michele Foley moved here 35 years ago from Cynthiana, they have worked to restore not one but two houses built in the 1790s.

Few people would be that tenacious — or, as the Foleys say, that foolish. But tenaciousness comes naturally to this town. Its founders returned here after surviving a bloody attack and years of captivity in Shawnee villages near Detroit.

Both the elegant home where the Foleys live and a rough, stone house the town’s founder built for his son will be on tour 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday during Historic Paris-Bourbon County’s annual Fall Open House.

The tour also includes nearby Moore’s Chapel, the 1850s Greek Revival sanctuary of Ruddles Mill United Methodist Church. Tickets are $15, $10 for HPBC members. More information: hopewellmuseum.org.

Even today, few people agree on how to spell this unincorporated community of about 75 households at the confluence of Hinkston and Stoner creeks in northern Bourbon County. It goes by various singular, plural and possessive forms of Ruddle, Ruddel, Ruddell and Mill.

But there is no uncertainty about the town’s founder and namesake. Capt. Isaac Ruddell, a pioneer and Revolutionary War officer, is buried here, too, at Mouth of Stoner Presbyterian Cemetery.

140922RuddlesMills0021In 1779, Ruddell enlarged and fortified pioneer cabins built a few years earlier in a nearby area of what is now Harrison County. But the next summer, a thousand Shawnee warriors and Canadian soldiers under the command of British Capt. Henry Bird attacked Ruddell’s Station and other nearby settlements.

More than 20 settlers were killed, and dozens more men, women and children were taken prisoner, marched to Detroit and held captive for years. After their release, Ruddell and most of his family returned to Kentucky and built a mill here in 1788.

But two of Ruddell’s sons, Stephen and Abraham, had been adopted by the Shawnee and stayed with the tribe for 15 years. Stephen, who married a Shawnee woman and was a chief, rejoined white civilization and became a Baptist preacher and missionary among the Shawnee, Delaware and Wyandot tribes in Ohio and Indiana.

Abraham returned to Kentucky in 1795, and his father built him the stone house the Foleys are gradually restoring near the creek banks. Abraham Ruddell operated a saw and grist mill there for several years before moving to Arkansas and fighting in the War of 1812.

The Foleys have removed wooden additions to the house, rebuilt the chimneys and put a steel frame in the basement to keep the cellar from collapsing. “All I can say is it’s not going to fall down,” she said. “We hope to do more one of these days.”

Things are much nicer up the hill, at the Federal-style house where the Foley’s have lived since 1979. They think the main rooms, each built as a separate unit with thick brick walls, were constructed in the 1790s and early 1800s.

Making the place habitable and comfortable was a long process for them and their two daughters, who are now grown and living near Nashville and Cincinnati.

The biggest chores — aside from electricity and plumbing and restoring the original woodwork — were undoing previous owners’ “improvements”. The Foleys found the house’s original wooden mantles in a barn, but one was badly warped from years of storage. A neighbor built a wood frame to gradually bend it back into shape so it could be returned to the house.

“Every morning we would water it down and tighten the clamps until it got straight,” she said. “At one point, all of the oil paint and buttermilk paint just started popping off.”

The Foleys are retired from state government jobs. They have planted their big yard with more than 20 varieties of magnolia trees, gardens and beds for their business, Ruddles Mills Perennials and Native Plants.

It is one of the few businesses left in Ruddles Mill, which once had several mills and distilleries. The town has many early 19th century structures, most of which are still in use after multiple renovations. People here don’t give up easily.

Click on each image to see larger photo and read caption:


Airy Castle on tour to benefit Historic Paris-Bourbon County

October 15, 2013

130923BourbonHouse-TE0103

Airy Castle in Bourbon County was built in 1872-73 by George Washington Bowen in the Italianate-Second Empire style. It will be on tour Oct. 20 to benefit Historic Paris-Bourbon County.  Photos by Tom Eblen 

 

PARIS — Jack and Sonja Brock, physicians who have lived in New Mexico for 35 years, came to Central Kentucky a decade ago looking for a house and land where they could someday retire with their pleasure horses.

After an extensive search, they found a huge Victorian mansion surrounded by 80 acres of rolling Bourbon County farmland. The Brocks envisioned their own little slice of heaven, but Airy Castle needed a hell of a lot of work.

“When we first saw the house,” Jack Brock said, “the basement had a foot of water in it.”

That was just the beginning. Plaster was peeling in every room. The porches were rotten. The plumbing was bad. The electrical system was worse. The attic was filled with birds, raccoons and tubs to catch water leaking from the roof.

“I had made an offer and then gotten out of it because the house didn’t pass any inspections at all,” Brock said.

“Sonja was real upset,” he added. “We drove back out to look at it. She was standing in the driveway and there were tears in her eyes and she said, ‘It’s this place or no place.’ That settled it.”

Thus began a long and expensive odyssey to restore Airy Castle. While the Brocks still have a couple of rooms to finish, the public can see the spectacular results of their work on Oct. 20, when the house will be open for tours to benefit the preservation organization Historic Paris-Bourbon County.

Airy Castle was built in 1872-73 in the Italianate-Second Empire style by George Washington Bowen, a Bourbon County merchant and Confederate veteran. It was the centerpiece of his 600-acre estate and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1888, the property was sold to the Larue family, which renamed it Wyndhurst and owned it for more than a century.

While Airy Castle had suffered from neglect and deferred maintenance, it was structurally sound. It also retained its ornate woodwork and much of its other historic fabric — quite literally. Original drapes still hung in one front parlor.

The Brocks hired Keith Buchanan, a contractor who had restored his own landmark 1850 home in Millersburg. He began by digging out and reflooring the basement. Then came new plumbing, wiring, heating and air conditioning. The hardest part, Buchanan said, was repairing plaster throughout the house.

The Brocks continued to live and work near Albuquerque for several years, but they had Buchanan convert the third-floor attic into an apartment where they could stay on visits without disturbing the renovation work.

When they returned to Airy Castle one weekend in 2006 for their son’s wedding in Louisville, they asked relatives to stay with them. But when Sonja Brock showed her guests to a second-floor bathroom where they could shower, the ceiling fell in.

Buchanan spent a year rebuilding the house’s extensive porches, carefully replicating original decorative details. He also reduced the porches in size from the inside to make room for four additional bathrooms and an elevator.

Delbert Isaacs of Berea installed a new slate roof, replicating the original. An impressive modern kitchen was built in the combined space of the old kitchen and a butler’s pantry.

While contractors worked, the Brocks scoured antique shops for period furniture, carpets and art. Looking at Airy Castle now, you would never know what a wreck it had been. As for the cost of the renovation, Brock would say only that it was “more than I care to talk about.”

Once Buchanan finishes restoring two front parlors and the entry hall, the Brocks plan to open the house as a bed and breakfast. They will continue to live in their cozy third-floor apartment.

Future projects include renovating a brick barn and a brick, two-story tenant house behind the mansion.

“I don’t know what it was about the house that first attracted me,” Sonja Brock said of Airy Castle. “It just struck me. It has personality. But it did look like a haunted house when we first bought it.”

If you go

Airy Castle house tour

When: 2 -5 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 20.

Where: 368 Larue Rd., Paris

Benefits: Historic Paris-Bourbon County

Cost: $15, $10 for members of Historic Paris-Bourbon County.

More information: Hopewellmuseum.org

Click on each image to see larger photo and read caption:

Tour de Paris event Oct. 19 offers chance to bike Paris Pike

October 8, 2013

One of the best-designed and most beautiful highways in America is U.S. 27-68 between Lexington and Paris. It has only one problem: no bicycle lanes.

Tour de Paris logoThat is why cyclists should be excited about the Tour de Paris on Oct. 19. For the first time ever, one lane of Paris Pike in each direction will be closed between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. for police-escorted rides between the two cities.

Loop rides of 24.2 miles and 13.4 miles begin at 9 a.m. at the Bourbon County Courthouse in Paris. Registration is $15 in advance, $20 that day. More information: (859) 987-6237 or ParisBourbonYMCA.org.

A free family fun ride around downtown Paris begins at 10:30 a.m. to showcase historic attractions and the city’s new bike lanes. The event is sponsored by the Paris Main Street Program, the Paris-Bourbon County YMCA and Quillen Leather & Tack.

The Tour de Paris is a brilliant idea. I hope it becomes an annual event.


Using technology to find the hidden history beneath our feet

May 21, 2013

130430Detectoring-TE0170

Ed and Kay Thomas watched as Scott Clark used a metal detector around an old bur oak near a circa 1810 farmhouse they are restoring in Bourbon County. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

PARIS — I always thought it would be fun to have a metal detector. I wasn’t so much interested in hunting for buried treasure as finding bits of history hidden a few inches beneath my feet.

Scott Clark, an Internet business consultant in Lexington, has similar interests. An avid metal detectorist since 1985, he has become quite skilled at it — and increasingly passionate about improving the ethics and image of his hobby.

Metal detecting doesn’t have the best of reputations, thanks to “treasure hunters” who look for relics on Civil War battlefields or pock-mark parks in search of lost valuables. Many historical archaeologists view detectorists about as favorably as a brain surgeon would a witch doctor.

130430Detectoring-TE0074But serious detectorists are trying to change that. Earlier this year, Clark was part of a group that worked with archaeologists to explore James Madison’s Montpelier estate in Virginia. Clark co-authored an article with Montpelier archaeologist Matthew Reeves on the blog of the Society for Historical Archaeology about how the two groups can work together and literally find common ground.

Clark has a blog at Detecting.us and often writes about best practices in the hobby. Those include always asking landowners’ permission before detecting, sharing finds with them and digging carefully so grounds are not damaged. He also avoids truly historic areas, such as battlefields.

Clark often donates his services to people who have lost valuables outside. Last month, he found a wedding band for a Versailles man after it slipped off his finger while he was mowing his yard.

Clark said he never accepts payment or rewards, but people often thank him by arranging access to interesting sites he can search. “The currency of the hobby is permission, which requires being trustworthy and transparent,” he said.

Clark detects to relax and for the love of history rather than profit. He said he has never sold anything he found — and even if he did, it wouldn’t begin to cover the thousands of dollars he has invested in detecting equipment.

Mostly, Clark finds old shoe buckles, keys, buttons, tools and coins. His most valuable find? A silver 1838 half-dime, worth a couple hundred dollars.

130430Detectoring-TE0408Clark said he likes to detect in places where people would have gathered a century or more ago — and lost things out of their pockets. That includes the grounds around old homes, schools, churches and stores.

Clark offered to show me how detecting works, then asked if I knew of a good hunting place. I immediately thought of Kay and Ed Thomas.

The Thomases live in a beautiful home in Bourbon County that her ancestors built in 1792. While restoring the place, the fun-loving couple delighted in finding interesting objects from the past. They are now restoring another place nearby — a circa-1810 brick farmhouse that her family bought in the 1940s.

As I suspected, the Thomases jumped at the chance to have Clark search their yards. Ed Thomas tagged along with Clark for the better part of three days while he carefully went over the ground with his detector, watching its dials and listening to its beeps, squawks and squeals.

To the untrained ear, the detector sounded like an arcade video game. But to Clark, the tones and gauges indicated the presence of objects in the ground — how big they were, what kind of metal they were made of and how deep they were, indicating how long they had been there.

Clark’s most interesting find on the Thomases’ property was a coin silver filigree bracelet with ivory cameos, which Kay Thomas thinks a long-dead relative bought on a European tour. He also found a few old coins, including an 1868 penny; spoon bowls of silver and pewter; a 1937 American Legion fob; old livestock tags and pieces of horse tack; and the remains of tools.

“Normally, I find three times this much stuff,” Clark said, clearly disappointed.

But the Thomases were thrilled — and not surprised that he didn’t find more.

“My relatives were frugal people!” Kay Thomas said. “If they had lost a gold ring, they would have been out here 24/7 until they found it.”

Ed Thomas also found something: a new hobby. For his birthday last Friday, his wife gave him a metal detector.

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Bourbon County tour house both glorious, notorious

September 27, 2011

PARIS — Every house has a story, but few have one as glorious and notorious as The Grange — from its opulent architecture to the dungeon in the cellar.

Owners Phil and Lillie Crowley were living in Lexington in 2003 when a Realtor told them The Grange was for sale. At first, it was beyond their means. But they couldn’t stop thinking about it.

“I walked in here and dropped my jaw; then the next day Phil came to see it and dropped his jaw,” said Lillie Crowley, a former math professor at Bluegrass Community and Technical College.

“I thought it was spectacularly beautiful,” said Phil Crowley, a biologist and ecologist at the University of Kentucky. “And the history was fascinating — it wasn’t all good, but it was fascinating.”

The Crowleys will open The Grange for a public tour Sunday to benefit the preservation group Historic Paris-Bourbon County.

Edward Stone began building the home that he called Oakland in 1800 on land his father received for Revolutionary War service. Construction took nearly 20 years, and Stone spared no expense. One of his professions was builder, and he apparently wanted to advertise his workmanship.

The Grange is considered one of Kentucky’s finest Federal-style homes. The five-bay front façade is flanked by pavilions with elaborate Palladian windows set in gently curved brick. The main floor has 14-foot ceilings and is trimmed with lavish woodwork and mantles. A leaded-glass fanlight and sidelights around the front door illuminate the main hall’s grand staircase.

But Stone was better known for his other profession: slave trader. Even many slave owners of that era looked down on slave traders because of their cruel methods. Few were more infamous than Stone, who might have been the inspiration for Mr. Haley, the unscrupulous slave trader in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s influential 1852 novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Stone marched long lines of chained men and women nearly 40 miles to Maysville, where he literally “sold them down the river” to Deep South cotton plantations. He also kept slaves chained to the walls of a dungeon beneath The Grange’s elegant front hall.

Manacles were removed from the walls and bars from a small window just a few years ago, Crowley said as he took me down to see the dungeon. All that remains of the room’s evil past are iron hinge posts for what must have been a heavy door.

Stone’s business eventually caught up with him. On a trip down the Ohio River in 1826, some of the 77 slaves he was taking to New Orleans overpowered and killed him near Owensboro.

Oakland was sold in 1832 to Hugh Brent, who renamed it Brentwood and left doodles on the walls of an upstairs bedroom for the Crowleys to find more than 170 years later, when they removed several layers of wallpaper.

The mansion, renamed The Grange about 1900, would have 11 more owners before the Crowleys bought it and the surrounding 33 acres.

“We’ve really tried to maintain the historic integrity of the architecture and still make the place livable,” Phil Crowley said of the 4,600-square-foot house, which didn’t get indoor plumbing until 1906. “Heating and cooling have been an issue, but our new geothermal system has made a big difference.”

Restoring and furnishing The Grange has become an expensive hobby.

“I needed a new car, and I got this instead,” Lillie Crowley said, pointing to a huge, circa 1800 English mahogany breakfront cabinet they bought for the dining room. A massive antique bed in the guest room came with the house — probably because it was too big to move.

The most challenging project has been remodeling the kitchen. It is in the home’s oldest wing, and contractor Jim Hodsdon found a shriveled shoe while gutting a former sleeping loft there. The shoe probably belonged to Stone.

The Crowleys have collected a pile of artifacts during renovation, from pieces of pottery to the bars from the dungeon window. Thankfully, though, they haven’t encountered any ghosts of people who were once chained below their front hall.

“Talk about a place with a rotten soul,” Phil Crowley said. “It’s hard to wrap your head around.”

If you go

Tour of The Grange

When: 2-5 p.m. Oct. 2.

Where: 1366 Millersburg Rd. (U.S. 68)

Tickets: $15, $10 for Historic Paris-Bourbon County members. No reservations needed.

Learn more: (859) 987-7274

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Bourbon home has two centuries of family history

September 25, 2010

Ed and Kay Thomas were born and raised in Bourbon County but spent 42 years in Pennsylvania, where he worked for GE/Lockheed Martin. As he was nearing retirement, they got to live in England for a couple of years.

But as Christmas Eve 2004 came to Yorkshire, and the Bourbon County Citizen-Advertiser arrived in the mail, they knew they would be coming home soon. Ewalt’s Crossroads was for sale.

Kay’s great-great-great-grandfather, Henry Ewalt, came to Kentucky from Pennsylvania in 1788. He bought 200 acres northeast of Paris and built a home at what is now the corner of U.S. 27 and Clay Kiser Road in 1792, the year Kentucky became a state.

The beautifully restored home, which includes a trove of antiques that the Thomases have collected over the years, will be open as a fund-raiser for Historic Paris-Bourbon County.

The home has been called Ewalt’s Crossroads since at least the 1840s, and it has never left the family. The Thomases bought the home from Kay’s cousin, Joe Ewalt, who acquired it in the 1990s.

At that time, the house was in bad shape, and Ewalt and his wife, Joanne, did significant restoration. They fixed the foundation and front façade and replaced all of the home’s major systems, among other things. They also built an addition with a family room and a first-floor master bedroom.

“Joe baked the cake; what we are doing is the icing,” Kay said. The couple work on the home constantly, and it shows. “We don’t play golf and we don’t play tennis,” she said. “This is our hobby.”

The Thomases, both 71, had restoration experience, having renovated a circa-1840 house in Chesapeake City, Md., that they used as a weekend getaway. Kay made most of the window treatments for Ewalt’s Crossroads, and Ed has been kept busy with carpentry projects.

The 1792 frame portion of Ewalt’s Crossroads retains much original detail: a fortified rear door, made to protect against the Indian attacks that were a serious threat in the area 218 years ago; horizontal cherry board paneling and walnut woodwork, which has always been painted to keep the house from being dark; and fancy crown molding in the front parlor.

A circa 1815 stone addition to the home has walls 22 inches thick and includes an entry hall/formal dining room and a kitchen, dining and family room, where the Thomases spend much of their time.

In the formal dining room, there is a small stairway leading up to a “travelers’ room,” where weary strangers could be offered lodging. The room locked from the outside, though, to keep any of those strangers from leaving in the middle of the night with the silverware.

Don’t expect to see the travelers’ room on the tour; the Thomases use it for storage. “I don’t think we’ll live long enough to ever get it cleaned up,” Kay said.

There’s nothing stuffy about this historic house, because of both its human scale and the Thomases’ classy and humorous decorating. It is an attractive blend of old and new that makes you feel at home. For example, the kitchen table is a 13-foot-long antique from a Paris upholstery shop, and it’s surrounded by modern, shiny aluminum chairs.

Is that an ancestor’s portrait over the parlor fireplace? No, just a regal 18th-century gentleman whose painting the Thomases bought in England.

“We don’t have a picture of Henry (Ewalt), but I like to think he would have looked like this in his later years,” Kay said. “We do have a picture of his son, Sam. He wasn’t the most handsome guy, let’s just say, so he’s hung in a dark corner of the hallway.”

The Thomases brought many treasures to Ewalt’s Crossroads, but the house is constantly revealing its own.

While having fireplaces restored, the Thomases discovered Civil War newspapers stuffed in chimney spaces. When replacing paneling, Ed found a heap of junk stuffed in an interior wall: old shoes, tools, hickory nuts, peach pits and a wicker torch, all well over a century old. The items are now on display.

The surrounding five acres has yielded many pieces of china and pottery dating to the early 1800s. They are displayed in an antique platter made into a table in front of the parlor fireplace.

“We dig things up in the garden all the time,” Kay said. “When I find that stuff out in the yard, I can’t blame it on anybody else. It was my family!”

If you go

Ewalt’s Crossroads tour

When: 2-5 p.m. Oct. 3

Where: U.S. 27 at Clay Kiser Rd., Bourbon County

Cost: $15, $10 for Historic Paris-Bourbon County members

Other: Refreshments served

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