Third-generation Lexington clothier Carl Meyers expands his shop

June 7, 2015
Carl Meyers, whose family has been a clothing retailer in Lexington since 1920, is expanding his upscale women's wear shop on Clay Street.   Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Carl Meyers, whose family has been a clothing retailer in Lexington since 1920, is expanding his upscale women’s wear shop on Clay Street. Photo by Tom Eblen

 

Every time Carl Meyers thinks he is retiring from the clothing business, a new opportunity comes up.

That’s what happened five years ago when Meyers, 63, moved back from New York and opened what he planned as a temporary shop at 111 Clay Ave. for the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.

Instead of closing at the end of the Games, the shop became Carl Meyers Sophisticated Style for Ladies. He just finished doubling the shop’s size and will celebrate with an open house from 4 to 8 p.m. June 11.

“I just can’t seem to stop,” Meyers said. “I’ve always had retail in me.”

His grandfather, Emanuel Meyers, was one of 11 sons of a Louisville vest tailor. In 1920, he and his brother Edward moved to Lexington to sell World War I Army surplus from a store on North Mill Street.

Much of their business was selling surplus khaki pants and boots to horse farmers. Through that, they got to know a lot of saddle horse people and eventually began making and selling custom riding apparel.

From 1938 to 1967, Meyers’ was on West Main Street beside Purcell’s department store. Carl Meyers’ parents, Marvin and Sydelle, burnished the brand with fine men’s and women’s clothing. In 1967, the store moved further east on Main Street, to the corner of what is now Martin Luther King Boulevard.

“They had just terrific taste,” Meyers said. “My mother ran the designer department and my father was the menswear guy.”

From childhood, Meyers seemed destined to be a retailer.

“I was ‘selling’ out of my mother’s attic when I was like 6 years old,” he said. “I had a little store with a little cash register up there. All of our friends would come up and ‘buy’ something.”

A few years later, Meyers started hanging around the riding apparel tailors at the Main Street store, learning about sewing, patterns and suit construction. After earning a fine arts degree at Boston University, Meyers joined the business.

“Then downtown kind of went bust,” he said, as retailers went out of business or moved to the new suburban shopping malls.

Meyers’ opened stores in Fayette and Lexington malls, but the changing business landscape doomed them. The downtown store closed in 1982 and the mall stores followed two years later.

Carl Meyers then refocused on custom riding apparel from a shop he ran for two decades on Walton Avenue, later moving to Romany Road. His flair for adding style to traditional riding “habits” earned him an international clientele.

In 2007, Meyers decided to mostly retire. He moved to New York for three years to oversee the riding apparel factory and enjoy big-city life.

“When I was in New York, I worked with a lot of young designers who would come in and get their samples made through me,” he said. “I really enjoyed it a lot, but I wasn’t making a whole lot of money.”

He started a short-lived menswear line with Crittenden Rawlings, a Kentuckian who had been president of Oxxford Clothes, a prestigious men’s suit label. (Rawlings now has his own menswear line, which he sells at his store in Midway and at more than 40 other retailers around the country.)

Meyers eventually sold the factory to his former employees and moved back to Lexington to help care for his elderly mother, who died in 2013.

“I thought I had retired,” he said, but the store he opened for the Equestrian Games attracted a following. “The women I was dealing with liked what we were doing.”

Meyers soon started adding dresses to his sportswear lines. With the expansion, he will carry more designer clothing and add shoes and furs.

Clothing trends keep getting more casual. “But when people get dressed up today, they really want to do it right, like for Derby and other occasions,” he said. “That’s where we’re finding the growth in the business.”

At this point, Meyers has no plans to retire again. In fact, with his non-compete agreement up soon, he is thinking about getting back into riding apparel — so long as he doesn’t have to travel the horse show circuit again.

“I signed a five-year lease with another five year option, so we’ll see how it goes,” he said. “And there’s an upstairs here.”

 

Meyers' clothing store was at this Main Street location in Lexington from 1938 to 1967. Photo provided

Meyers’ clothing store was at this Main Street location in Lexington from 1938 to 1967.