Restored Gratz Park ‘kids’ return to James Lane Allen fountain

June 24, 2015

After a seven-month, $57,000 restoration, the bronze boy and girl who have graced the Gratz Park fountain since 1933 returned to their granite perches Wednesday.

Amanda Matthews and Brad Connell of Prometheus Foundry in Lexington did a major conservation of the statues, which have been damaged and improperly repaired many times.

“Everything went great with the repair,” Matthews said. “They should be good for another 100 years.”

A crane lifted the granite base and statues back into place, and Connell reattached a restored plaque stating that the fountain was a gift to the children of Lexington from author James Lane Allen.

The city and the Gratz Park Neighborhood Association financed conservation of the statues and reconstruction of the fountain, which had many structural and plumbing problems. The fountain, which cost $154,800 to rebuild, is expected to reopen in early July.

Amanda Matthews of Prometheus Foundary, right, and Rick Deaton of American Industrial Contractors discussed how to reattach the girl's statue in the James Lane Allen fountain at Gratz Park on Wednesday. The statues, erected in 1933 with a legacy left by Lexington author James Lane Allen, received a seven-month, $57,000 restoration at Prometheus over the winter.  Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Amanda Matthews of Prometheus Foundary, right, and Rick Deaton of American Industrial Contractors discussed how to reattach the girl’s statue in the James Lane Allen fountain at Gratz Park. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

Brad Connell, left, Amanda Matthews and Keith Spears of Prometheus Foundary on Wednesday replaced the refurbished plaque to author James Lane Allen on the Gratz Park fountain, which is nearing completion of a $211,840 restoration. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Brad Connell, left, Amanda Matthews and Keith Spears of Prometheus Foundary replaced the refurbished plaque to author James Lane Allen.

Amanda Matthews, left, and Brad Connell, right, of Prometheus Foundary reattach the refurbished statue of the boy on the fountain at Gratz Park, which is nearing completion of a seven-month restoration. The fountain, built in 1933 with a legacy from Lexington-born author James Lane Allen, includes statues of a boy and girl symbolizing the wonder of youth. Allen donated money for the fountain in honor of the children of Lexington. At center is Mike Franz, operations manager of American Industrial Contractors. Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Amanda Matthews, left, and Brad Connell, right, reattach the refurbished statue of the boy on the fountain.

Staff members of Prometheus Foundry and American Industrial Contractors reattach the refurbished boy's statue on the James Lane Allen fountain in Gratz Park. Left to right are Mike Franz, Brad Connell, Amanda Matthews and Keith Spears. The fountain and statues, erected in 1933 with a legacy gift from author James Lane Allen, have received a seven-month restoration paid for by the city and the Gratz Park Neighborhood Association.  Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Staff members of Prometheus Foundry and American Industrial Contractors reattach the refurbished boy’s statue on the James Lane Allen fountain in Gratz Park. Left to right are Mike Franz, Brad Connell, Amanda Matthews and Keith Spears.

Mike Franz and Amanda Matthews helped reposition the girl's statue on the Gratz Park fountain Wednesday after Matthews and her partner, Brad Connell, restored the circa 1933 bronze statues.  The restored fountain is to reopen in early July.  Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Mike Franz and Amanda Matthews helped reposition the girl’s statue on the Gratz Park fountain.

Amanda Matthews of Prometheus Foundry inspected the girl's statue after it was reattached to the James Lane Allen fountain in Gratz Park on Wednesday. Matthews and her partner, Brad Connell, of Prometheus Foundry, restored the bronze statues, which had been damaged and "repaired" several times since being installed in 1933.  Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Amanda Matthews of Prometheus Foundry inspected the girl’s statue after it was reattached.

Anthony Williams, project manager with the City's Parks and Recreation Department, and Amanda Matthews of Prometheus Foundry inspected the reinstalled statues of the boy and girl on the James Lane Allen fountain in Gratz Park on Wednesday. Matthews and her partner, Brad Connell, removed the statues in November for refurbishing. They were erected in 1933 as part of a legacy gift to the children of Lexington from author James Lane Allen.  Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Anthony Williams, project manager with the City’s Parks and Recreation Department, and Amanda Matthews of Prometheus Foundry inspected the reinstalled statues of the boy and girl on the James Lane Allen fountain in Gratz Park.


Parents want to restore, not replace, Jacobson Park playground

July 1, 2014

JacobsonThe Jacobson Park playground was built in 1993.  Photo by Mark Cornelison

 

When Rachel Carpenter heard that the huge “creative” playgrounds that more than 2,000 community volunteers built at Jacobson and Shillito parks in 1992 and 1993 are to be torn down and replaced, she was alarmed. So were many of her friends.

The mothers say their toddlers can play for hours on these sprawling wooden structures, with their castle turrets, bridges, slides, chutes and myriad nooks to “hide” in and explore.

But they worry that the replacements will be like most new playgrounds they see: designed to be so safety-conscious and risk-averse that they don’t inspire creativity and are simply not much fun for kids.

Carpenter said she and her husband, Charles, took their 2-year-old daughter, Corabell, to the new metal-and-plastic playground at Masterson Station Park once. “We’re not impressed,” she said. “It’s flashy. But after 25 minutes, she was bored and left to play in the tall grass nearby.”

The recently passed city budget includes up to $300,000 to replace the Jacobson Park playground this year, and Lexington Parks & Recreation hopes to get funding next year to replace the smaller one at Shillito Park.

Carpenter has created a “Save Jacobson Park Playground!” Facebook page and launched an online petition that has attracted more than 300 signatures and the attention of several Urban County Council members.

“I think they underestimate how much people like the park the way it is,” said Carpenter, who would rather see taxpayer money used to refurbish and maintain the existing playgrounds. She cited the example of a similar creative playground in St. Andrews, New Brunswick, Canada, that was built in 1993 and restored last year.

Brad Chambers, the city’s new Parks & Recreation director, said he wasn’t aware of any serious injuries or lawsuits involving the playgrounds. But he said there are safety concerns because the wooden structures have deteriorated with age.

Chambers said the playgrounds do not meet some current safety codes and accessibility rules, and they have become a maintenance challenge because of the wood splintering, warping and rotting.

“It’s like any wood that has been outdoors for 20-plus years,” he said. “Our concern is obviously going to be safety.”

But Chambers said officials have made no decisions about the design or materials for the new Jacobson Park playground. He said the department plans to schedule several public meetings later this summer to hear from citizens about what kind of new playground they want and to present options.

The Jacobson and Shillito park playgrounds were the largest of four built in the early 1990s. Two others, at the Dunbar Community Center and Picadome Elementary School, were torn down in 2008. At that time, city officials said it was more time-consuming to maintain the unique wooden playgrounds than factory-made play equipment.

Funding for the four creative playgrounds was provided by the city, businesses and foundations, and most of the labor came from citizen volunteers. Jacobson Park’s playground was the largest, costing $87,000 and involving 2,500 volunteers. The projects were led by the citizens group Friends of the Parks, then chaired by Sandy Shafer, who later was elected to the Urban County Council.

“I knew there would be this day,” Shafer said. “These playgrounds have a life of 20 or 25 years, because they’re built with treated lumber just like your deck.”

Shafer said the playgrounds have served the community well. But just as valuable, she said, was the community spirit created by the volunteers who built them. She said many volunteers have told her over the years that they took special pride in bringing children, grandchildren and out-of-town visitors to the playgrounds because they helped build them.

“I wish we could do more community-build projects,” she said. “They have a value, like the old-fashioned barn-raisings, because you work with and get to know people you might otherwise not come in contact with.”

Shafer said she was shopping at a home-improvement store Monday when a woman who lives in the old Dunbar-Russell School area of North Lexington recognized her and spoke.

“You’re Sandy Shafer, aren’t you?” she said the woman asked, adding, “You helped build my community by putting a playground over there.”