Shop struggles with constant downtown construction projects

November 30, 2014

141124Failte0013At her first location, Liza Hendley Betz’s Fáilte Irish Imports faced the long Limestone reconstruction project. Now in the red building with McCarthy’s Irish Bar, it is surrounded by CentrePointe excavation and renovation of the 21C Museum Hotel. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

As she prepares to celebrate the 13th anniversary of opening Fáilte Irish Imports, Dublin native Liza Hendley Betz feels as if the luck of the Irish has been replaced by the curse of downtown redevelopment.

For the first eight years after she opened her shop in 2001, Hendley’s business prospered on South Limestone, just off the corner of High Street.

Betz’s bread and butter was selling Irish bread and butter — plus sausages, Bewley’s tea, Batchelor’s canned beans, Cadbury’s sweets and other comfort food from home to the Emerald Isle’s large expatriate community in Central Kentucky. She also did a good business in Irish tweeds, Celtic jewelry and souvenirs.

Then, with two weeks’ warning, South Limestone was shut down for 11 months for a major street reconstruction project.

141124Failte0043Her business struggled, but she was able to move in early 2010 to her dream location: beside McCarthy’s Irish Bar on South Upper Street. But the old red-and-green building also was across the street from the stalled CentrePointe project, which was then a grassy field.

“This is where I always wanted to be,” Betz said of the close proximity to McCarthy’s, a social center for the Irish community where she used to serve drinks.

As for CentrePointe, she figured, “I’ll deal with it when it happens. It can’t be any worse than what happened before.”

Or could it? Last December, all of the street parking across from her shop was closed after CentrePointe’s developer got city permission to begin blasting and excavation.

The street was a noisy, dusty mess for most of this year as the CentrePointe block was converted into a 40-foot limestone pit. Then everything stopped. Developer Dudley Webb is now trying to raise money to build an underground garage.

To make matters worse, the block of North Upper Street above Fáilte has been closed for months so the old First National Bank Building can be renovated into 21C Museum Hotel.

“This used to be a busy intersection,” she said. “You can go out here now and do a dance in the middle of the street. It’s hard these days to keep a business going with all this around you.”

Betz has rented a single parking space beside her shop, which has made it more convenient for customers to stop in for quick purchases.

Like many retailers, Fáilte’s prime season is between Thanksgiving and New Year’s, not just for gift items but because Irish Americans want food from home for their holiday celebrations.

On Dec. 12, the shop will celebrate its 13th anniversary with a 10 percent off sale, plus a party with Guinness beer, souvenir glasses and Irish music next door at McCarthy’s between 7 and 9 p.m.

Betz said she needs a big December, although her holiday season will extend to St. Patrick’s Day on March 17. She recently became a United States citizen, so she also is thinking about something special for next July 4 — if she can keep the doors open that long.

“It’s the worst time we’ve ever had,” said Betz, whose husband is a horse veterinarian. She minds the shop while caring for their two small children.

Like any good entrepreneur, Betz has been looking for ways to broaden her business beyond food and gifts. She has organized annual tours of Ireland, and she’s looking to use her Irish expertise to grow the travel business. She also is thinking about clearing some space in the tiny shop for a couple of tables to serve tea.

“I know I need to change things up a bit,” she said. “But I’m afraid to put money into anything right now.”

Betz also knows that, in the long run, she will have a great location when 21C opens and whatever ends up being built at CentrePointe is finished. But, as the famous saying goes, people don’t eat in the long run.

“I’m in the middle of downtown,” she said. “Who would think this is a bad location?”


Chevy Chase entrepreneurs plan Small Business Saturday event

November 23, 2014

141120ChevyChase-TE0044High Street Fly, a clothing boutique, is one of several new shops in Chevy Chase. Below, Danielle Montague, owner of MonTea specialty tea shop, helped organize the area’s Small Business Saturday event on Nov. 29. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

The holiday shopping frenzy begins this week, and local business owners want you to remember Small Business Saturday between Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

This day is about supporting locally owned businesses so more of your money stays in your community. It is about finding goods and services you never find in big-box stores. And it is about helping to keep your town unique and interesting, rather than letting it become just another generic link in the national retail chains.

One of Central Kentucky’s biggest Small Business Saturday events Nov. 29 is being planned by the Chevy Chase Business Owners Association. While some of its activities will last all day, most will be between 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Participating shops will have refreshments and a “candy-cane pull” for discount coupons at other neighborhood stores. The association also is working with American Express, which offers a special discount through its Small Business Saturday program. (More information: Americanexpress.com.)

141119ChevyChase-TE0021Chevy Chase merchants are organizing a coat drive for Lexington Rescue Mission and a store window-decorating contest in which customers can vote. Free carriage rides will be offered in front of John’s New Classic Shoes on South Ashland Avenue.

“Santa will be making visits, and we’re working on carolers,” said Danielle Montague, an association leader and owner of MonTea, a specialty tea shop.

Chevy Chase was built between the 1920s and 1960s on land that had been part of statesman Henry Clay’s Ashland estate. Developer Henry Clay Simpson named the area for the Maryland golf club, where he was a member. One of Lexington’s first “suburban” shopping districts was built to serve the neighborhood.

“We were the original Hamburg,” Montague said with a smile. “We have just about everything here, and it’s walkable.”

The Chevy Chase business district has had a tough year, with months of reconstruction on Euclid Avenue and controversy over a rowdy bar the city shut down in September. But there has been a lot of good news, too.

The business district has been gaining popularity, as a variety of stores, including The Morris Book Shop, Worlds Apart and Donut Days, came in from the suburbs to join longtime businesses such as Farmer’s Jewelers and Chevy Chase Hardware. Several new stores have opened this year, including two in the past few weeks.

Ann-Michael Rawlings, who has operated Calypso Boutique in the Woodland Triangle for seven years, was at Morris buying a book this summer when she noticed the space beside Chevy Chase Hardware was for rent.

She quickly negotiated a lease, renovated it and opened her second boutique, High Street Fly, which specializes in local-themed T-shirts and vintage cowboy boots.

“I love the convenience of the neighborhood,” Rawlings said. “With the hardware store next door, even a lot of guys come in.”

Online retailer C.C. Prep Clothing & Accessories is owned by Atlantans, but when they chose Lexington as the location for their second store (after Charlottesville, Va.), they wanted to be in Chevy Chase.

“We didn’t really look anywhere else,” said manager Amanda Caldwell, who opened the store Nov. 14. “It’s great to be in an area where they support small businesses.”

Melissa Mautz has certainly found that to be true since opening the Pet Wants store in February. It sells fresh, regionally made dog and cat food, GMO-free chicken feed and American-made pet accessories.

“I knew I wanted to be in Chevy Chase, and business has been awesome,” she said. “We like being a part of this community.”

But like most retailers, Chevy Chase’s business owners know that the holiday season can make or break their year. “We rely heavily on it,” Montague said. “You can make your entire year’s rent in a month.”

Gary Doernberg, who opened Corner Wines five years ago in a tiny space that originally was a 1930s gas station, agrees. His shop specializes in low-priced wine lots from top vineyards, and this is high season for entertaining and gift-giving. But he has found Chevy Chase to be a great place to do business year-around.

“I’ve always loved this location,” Doernberg said. “I’ve been in the wine business, wholesale or retail, for 40 years. This is not the most money I’ve ever made, but it’s the most fun I’ve ever had.”

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House-flipping venture turns Victorian disaster into showplace

October 19, 2014

141009Rehab0027

Left to right, Josh Despain, Bennett Clark, Ryan Clark and Michael Hogan spent 16 months renovating a circa 1889 mansion at 515 North Broadway that was filled with trash and animal waste when a lender foreclosed on the previous owner last year. They sat on the front porch  with a photo of the house taken when they bought it.  After a complete renovation, the house is now for sale for $1.2 million. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

The business venture began innocently enough. Four young men with backgrounds in architecture and real estate decided to pool their money, buy an old house, renovate it and try to resell it at a profit.

They looked for a manageable project; perhaps a 1920s bungalow in need of a little updating.

What they ended up with was a three-story, 5,282-square-foot Queen Anne mansion built in 1889 that was such a disaster it made headlines. Over the next 16 months, this house-flipping project almost flipped them.

But the disaster at 515 North Broadway is now a beautiful, completely renovated showplace, listed for sale for $1.2 million. And the four young men have learned some valuable lessons about construction, historic preservation and business.

“This project literally was the epitome of everything: it took longer, was harder and cost more than what we expected it to,” said Josh Despain, a landscape architect.

140118BroadwayHouse0004Despain, architect Michael Hogan and soon-to-be architect Ryan Clark work together at Ross Tarrant Architects. They spend most of their days behind desks.

“We were interested in the idea of getting our hands dirty and doing some construction ourselves,” Hogan said.

And, as young married men hoping to start families, they were looking for some extra money, too. So they teamed up with Clark’s cousin, Bennett Clark, a single real estate agent and builder who had been thinking along the same lines.

They had looked at several old houses when 515 North Broadway made headlines in February 2013. The Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. foreclosed on the previous owner. Authorities put her belongings on the sidewalk, almost stopping traffic as passersby picked through it.

Everything was filthy and covered in animal waste, prompting city health and code enforcement officers to step in. The inside of the house was even worse. The smell sickened almost everyone who stepped inside.

141009Rehab0007But the mansion was well-located, structurally sound and retained a lot of its original character. The lender got a dozen offers, and the four guys bought it for $195,752.

“Until we started taking out the plaster and some of the damaged areas, we didn’t really know what kind of condition it was in,” Hogan said. “But, structurally, we felt really good about it.”

Also salvageable were most of the original windows, including some stained-glass ones, and most of the woodwork and flooring. There was a magnificent staircase that rose three stories through the middle of the house.

But the partners quickly realized that all of the plaster needed to be removed to make way for new insulation, plumbing, electricity and interior walls.

“We saw it as a unique opportunity to build a new house within the shell of an original Victorian,” Hogan said.

Added Bennett Clark: “Our mindset was to make the house modern in the places that you need for a house to be modern, but bring back the formal areas to their original glory.”

141009Rehab0002To save money, the partners did about 60 percent of the labor themselves — mostly demolition, basic carpentry, landscaping, paint scraping and other grunt work. They hired contractors for skilled work such as electricity, plumbing, HVAC, roofing and window restoration.

Bennett Clark, who was the general contractor, made the reconstruction project his full-time job. The other three worked nights, weekends and vacations there.

“Our wives hate this house,” Ryan Clark said, as the other three chimed in about how their own homes were neglected during the project.

Because the house is in a city historic district, the partners had to follow strict guidelines on the exterior renovation. They weren’t expecting any special treatment, either: the city’s rule book pictures their house on the cover.

But they said it turned out to be a pleasant experience.

“If you’re just up front with them from the get-go and you’re not trying to hide anything, they’re super easy to work with,” Despain said.

The partners’ challenge now is selling the house for enough to recoup their investment and make a profit. Although expensive, the price is within the range of similar downtown mansions, many of which have had less extensive renovations.

So, do they plan to do this again? They think so, but not anytime soon. Since beginning the work in mid-2013, the three married guys have all had their first children. They expect to have less free time in the near future for construction.

The partners said they learned that to be successful in the renovation business, it must be your business, not a hobby you do in your spare time. A property must be chosen wisely, and the cost of purchase and renovation carefully calculated.

“It was the first project we had done together, so we wanted to make sure we did it right,” Hogan said. “Not only were we trying to make money, but we were really trying to learn a lot about historic preservation. It turned out really well.”

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As Sav’s owner recovers, family, friends keep restaurant going

June 10, 2014

140610Savs-TE0003Bangaly Savan頎, left, served lunch Tuesday to Steve Baron, owner of CD Central on South Limestone Street. Savan頎 has been running Sav’s Grill & West African Cuisine at the corner of South Limestone and East Maxwell streets since his father, Mamadou Savan頎 burned himself badly while cooking June 3. Photos by Tom Eblen  

 

Mamadou “Sav” Savané learned to cook traditional West African food as a child in Guinea by watching his mother and sisters. The recipes were never written down. They were just in his head, until a few weeks ago.

That’s when the owner of Sav’s Grill & West African Cuisine at 304 South Limestone started recording his recipes and teaching his son, Bangaly, how to cook them. His timing couldn’t have been better.

Savané was preparing a bigger-than-usual batch of peanut chicken stew for the lunch crowd on June 3 when the pot slipped from his hands as he pulled it off the stove, said his wife, Rachel.

savThe boiling liquid spilled all over Savané, causing second-degree burns over half his body and putting him in the University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital’s intensive-care unit for five days. Savané is out of danger and could be released from the hospital as early as Wednesday. But he has a long recovery ahead.

“If this accident were two months ago, the restaurant would have closed, because nobody else could do it,” Rachel Savané said. “Our son, who turns 20 the day after Father’s Day, has stepped into his dad’s shoes, cooking everything, running the restaurant. I’m doing what I can to help, but he’s in charge.”

Other family and friends also have stepped forward to help, both at his restaurant and at her jewelry gallery, Savané Silver, 130 North Broadway.

At Sav’s Grill on Tuesday, Bangaly, his mother and his sister, Diaka, 15, were serving customers with help from employees and Youssouf Komara, who said he has been Savané’s best friend since they were 6 years old in Guinea. Komara traveled from Milwaukee, where he teaches middle school French and owns a restaurant and club.

“He’s a very good guy,” Komara said of Savané. A lot of Lexington people agree.

The business association Local First Lexington, Smiley Pete Publishing and others have organized a fundraiser to help Savané, who has medical insurance, cover additional business expenses. Within hours of launching the campaign Tuesday on Giveforward.com, the Feast of Love for Sav fund had collected more than $22,000.

The fundraiser includes an event 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday at Smiley Pete’s offices, 434 Old Vine Street, with food and beverages from local businesses. Admission is $5.

“Apparently, Sav did the work of four people, seven days a week,” said Chuck Creacy, co-owner of Smiley Pete.

“I visited him in the hospital, and he’s as hurt as anybody I’ve ever seen,” Creacy said. “They’re going to need to hire help, because the worst thing he could do is go back to work before he’s fully recovered. We certainly want to make sure we don’t lose one of our unique local restaurants.”

The Savanés met while Rachel was a Peace Corps volunteer in Guinea in the early 1990s. They came to this country and married in 1993. She made jewelry, and he worked for UPS and the Hyatt Regency Lexington before turning his passion for cooking into a business.

He opened Sav’s Grill in September 2008, weathering both the nation’s financial crisis and the long reconstruction of South Limestone. In July 2012, Savané opened Sav’s Chill nearby to sell a friend’s homemade ice cream.

Savané has been a neighborhood leader and a strong supporter of Local First Lexington, said Steve Baron, the owner of CD Central down the street.

“He’s just one of those terrific, positive people,” Baron said as he stopped at Sav’s Grill for lunch Tuesday. “It’s so sad to see something like that happen.”

Steve Davis, who teaches African history at UK, was one of many regular customers who came in Tuesday for lunch and to sign a big get-well card. He said Savané has spoken to his classes about West African food traditions.

“He is so loved in this community,” said Debra Hensley, an insurance agent and a former Urban County Council member. “He is just a bundle of joy to be around.”

Bangaly Savané, who since graduating from Henry Clay High School in 2012 has worked at the restaurant and has begun studying to be a commercial pilot, said he and his family have been overwhelmed by the community’s support.

“One guy came in and broke down crying in front of me,” he said. “I couldn’t believe it.”

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Story magazine founder wanted to tell Kentucky stories

May 4, 2014

story1 Julie Wilson is founder, publisher and editor of Story magazine. Photo by Tom Eblen

 

How does a woman born in Detroit become the founder, editor and publisher of a magazine dedicated to telling Kentucky stories? Well, there’s a story there.

Julie Wilson’s father was born into a big family in the Harlan County community of Pathfork. Like thousands of Kentuckians after World War II, he migrated north to seek his fortune. And, like many of those thousands, he eventually got homesick and returned to Kentucky.

Wilson, who has lived in Lexington since she was 4 years old, thinks her father’s experience nurtured her love for Kentucky in all its diversity. She now shares that love in each quarterly issue of Story magazine.

“There are so many unique stories in Kentucky,” Wilson said. “And every time we go out and talk to somebody, we get two more story ideas.”

With nearly two years of publication under their belts, Wilson and her partners are expanding Story magazine into a broader brand built around Kentucky culture and pride.

Kentucky Educational Television on May 14 will show the first episode of backStory, a quarterly program about the making of the magazine. Story is producing the show with Lexington-based Locker Public Relations.

Another project in the works, called Sessions, will feature collaborations of Kentucky musicians from a variety of genres. For that, Wilson is partnering with the magazine’s National Avenue neighbor, Duane Lundy of Shangri-La Productions.

story2Musicians scheduled up for the first session, on June 25, include Willie Breeding of The Breedings; Mark Heidiger of Vandaveer; and Stephen Trask, composer of the 1998 rock musicalHedwig and the Angry Inch, a revival of which opened recently on Broadway.

Wilson said a limited number of tickets for each session will be sold through The Morris Book Shop. An edited video will be posted online soon afterward. Event details will be available soon at Storythemagazine.com.

Wilson, 43, is a graduate of the University of Kentucky journalism program who worked as a free-lance writer for the Herald-Leader and a reporter for the Richmond Register. Then she spent a decade learning the magazine business at Host Communications, where she edited business-to-business magazines for the tour and spa industries.

After a year and a half as publisher of Kentucky Bride magazine, Wilson got to thinking about all of the interesting Kentucky stories she heard about but wasn’t seeing in other publications.

The cover of Story magazine’s first issue, which Wilson wrote, was a profile of Ashley Brock, a successful young model who travels from her home in Leslie County to do photo shoots in Europe and Asia.

“We look for how we can tell stories about Kentucky that are debunking the myths that are out there,” Wilson said.

She seeks out stories about Kentuckians doing cutting-edge things. Some are famous, such as the current issue’s cover subject, the late Louisville-born journalist Hunter S. Thompson. But many stories are about people whom readers might never have heard about otherwise, such as Dr. Joseph Yocum, a Nicholasville veterinarian who is a pioneer in animal stem-cell therapy, or Tim Hensley and Jane Post, gourmet mushroom farmers in Madison County.

story3Regular features focus on successful Kentucky expatriates, artists and craftsmen, musicians, philanthropists and people doing good things in their communities. Wilson said she tries to include features from across the state “so people won’t think we’re just a Lexington and Louisville magazine.”

She developed Story’s concept with Tim Jones, who as creative director oversees the magazine’s sophisticated design, and Laurel Cassidy, the associate publisher, who focuses on advertising sales. Bart Mahan is chief operating officer, and Allison May and Sara Plummer are account executives.

Wilson said the business is close to breaking even. The magazine has a distribution of about 18,000 copies and 2,200 paid subscribers, many of them Kentuckians living out of state. Eventually, she hopes to publish bimonthly.

Wilson’s husband, David Wilson, is chief operating officer of Yonder Interactive Neighborhoods, a sustainability education consultant. They have a daughter, who turns 9 this week.

“And, yes, her name is Story,” Julie Wilson said. “She says she was the first Story — but we didn’t name the magazine after her.”

The Lexington chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners recently gave Wilson an award as small business owner of the year.

“It has been more rewarding than I ever expected,” she said of the magazine’s first two years. “But I’m just doing this by the seat of my pants. I hope they know that.”


Lexington’s Fayette Cigar Store a downtown retail survivor

February 10, 2014

140206FayetteCigar0060

Fayette Cigar Store has been at 137 E. Main St. since Dale Ferguson bought the building in 1977. He resisted attempts by the city to buy the building when it purchased other property on the block, which now includes the Fayette County Court Houses, left, and the Downtown Arts Center, right. Below, Ferguson and a daughter, Dee Bright. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

With all of the talk about the need to attract retailers back to downtown Lexington, I thought it would be good to talk with one who never left.

Dale Ferguson, 75, and his family have been selling newspapers, magazines, tobacco products and sundries downtown since 1928.

That was the year his father, H.C. Ferguson, opened a newsstand on Mill Street. Soon after World War II started, he bought Fayette Cigar Store at 151 West Main Street “when the owner got drafted,” Ferguson said.

When that building was scheduled for a renovation that would have forced him to close for several months, Dale Ferguson bought a bigger building at 137 East Main in 1977 and moved the business. Fayette Cigar Store has been there ever since, despite the best efforts of developers and city officials to buy his property.

Surrounding buildings were bought in the 1980s for a proposed World Trade Center and cultural complex. Eventually, the new Fayette County Court House complex was built on his west side and the Downtown Arts Center on his east side.

At one point, Ferguson said, he agreed to city requests to swap his building for a similar one in the next block, but financial terms couldn’t be reached with its owner. So Ferguson stayed put, through thick and thin, trying to make a living on his 32-foot-long slice of Main Street.

140206FayetteCigar0023Ferguson’s three-story building dates from 1864, with central and rear sections added in the early 1900s. Before he bought the building, bookies operated in the upper floors, which was connected to an adjacent building by a hole in the wall. Now, the upper floors are accessed by an antique elevator.

Modern fire codes would keep Ferguson from using the upper floors for anything but storage and an office unless he could figure out a way to build a staircase.

“That stops a lot of downtown development,” he said, “A lot of these old buildings don’t have fire escapes.”

Ferguson said making Main Street one-way in 1971 hurt business, as did eliminating more and more street parking over the years.

“It was a mistake to do it,” he said of the one-way conversion, but added that he isn’t convinced making Main Street two-way again would do much good. “It’s too late.”

A bigger improvement, he said, would be adding more street parking, preferably angled or perpendicular spaces that would be easier for people to use and accommodate more cars.

During the last streetscape renovation in 2010, Ferguson lost a loading zone in front of his store, which hurt business.

“People would pull up, run in and buy a $200 box of cigars, and be gone in a few minutes,” he said. “They can’t do that anymore.”

But the biggest obstacle Ferguson sees to getting more retailers back in downtown Lexington is high per-square-foot rents.

“If I didn’t own my building, I wouldn’t be here,” he said. “I blame a lot of it on the Webbs, who overpaid for property and then had to get a return on their investment.” But the biggest problem, Ferguson said, is that too few people work downtown — he suspects less than a fifth as many as did two or three decades ago. The addition of downtown condos over the past decade hasn’t made much difference, he said. But he thinks more big apartment complexes like Park Plaza would help.

Ferguson now runs Fayette Cigar Store seven days a week with help from one of his four daughters, Dee Bright. Thanks to a resurgence in cigar smoking, customers come to the store for its extensive selection of high-end smokes, which are kept in a former bank vault in back. Pipe smoking also is on the rebound as cigarettes decline.

Cigars and fine pipe tobacco are the store’s biggest profit centers. But Ferguson says he doesn’t know what the future holds, noting that all of his main wares — tobacco, magazines, newspapers and greeting cards — have been in decline for years.

Ferguson has tried to fight back by adding niche products such as basic drugstore items and local honey. Still, business is tough.

“I have a pretty loyal customer base,” he said. “Thank God for that.”

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More small Lexington businesses are ‘doing well by doing good’

February 4, 2013

West Sixth Brewery partners, left to right, Ben Self, Joe Kuosman, Robin Sither and Brady Barlow made community improvement part of their business plan. Photos by Tom Eblen

 

As so many businesses become consolidated and conglomerated, the only things that seem to matter are profit, shareholder value and excessive executive compensation. Communities, like employees, become expendable.

But the trend with small, locally owned businesses seems different, at least in Lexington. You don’t have to look far to see it.

Since its creation in 2008, Local First Lexington, a non-profit alliance of locally owned and independently operated businesses, has made community enrichment a priority. And many business people do things on their own, such as insurance agent Debra Hensley, who spends a lot of time on public service and community-building.

These business people are doing great things for Lexington. But they are quick to tell you that their efforts also are good for their businesses. There’s a term for it: “Doing well by doing good.”

Stella’s Kentucky Deli does regular “dining for a cause” nights, donating 15 percent of sales to a local charity. Thai Orchid, Nick Ryan’s Saloon and many other restaurants do similar fund-raising nights and events.

Lexington retailers often donate merchandise or gift certificates for charity auctions, or they sponsor events and non-profit organizations. Some examples: Joseph-Beth Booksellers has book fairs for organizations, giving them as much as 20 percent of sales. The Morris Book Shop sponsors several local non-profits, makes donations and opens its store for events.

“I think you’re seeing a lot more of it,” said Ben Self, one of four partners who opened West Sixth Brewery in April. “I think people are starting to understand that it’s not a one-way street. It’s beneficial all the way around.

“That’s the future of building communities: businesses and non-profits working together for common goals.”

West Sixth Brewery has some of Lexington’s most ambitious community outreach efforts, beginning with the 90,000-square-foot former bread factory the partners bought for their brewery and tasting room.

They rent space in the rambling building to artists, writers and a variety of community-minded businesses and non-profit organizations. Those include Broke Spoke Community Bike Shop, Magic Beans Coffee Roasters, Roller Girls of Central Kentucky, and FoodChain, a sustainable urban agriculture non-profit started by Self’s wife, Rebecca.

“It’s nice to see the synergies and cooperation among the different groups,” said partner Joe Kuosman, noting the Roller Girls have after-hours events at the brewery, where its resident artists’ work is displayed.

“We committed from the very beginning to giving 6 percent of our profits to local charitable organizations,” Self said of the brewery, “and we far exceeded that the first year.”

In addition, the brewery sponsors an event for a different local non-profit each month, donating 6 percent of sales that night. The next one, on Wednesday, benefits the Community Farm Alliance.

The events often bring in people who have never been to West Sixth, but then come back again and again, partner Brady Barlow said.

West Sixth’s partners also set sustainability goals for their business, from rehabilitating an old building with reclaimed wood fixtures to recycling waste, and canning rather than bottling their beer since it’s easier to recycle.

Bourbon n’ Toulouse restaurant owners Will Pieratt, left, and Kevin Heathcoat.

Bourbon n’ Toulouse, a Chevy Chase restaurant that serves good, cheap Cajun food, has made community outreach the core of its marketing strategy since it opened in 2004. Partners Will Pieratt and Kevin Heathcoat give away a lot of gift certificates for charity and frequently sponsor events where as much as 25 percent of that day’s sales go to a non-profit.

The restaurant’s two biggest annual events are Empty Bowls, a partnership with Kentucky Mudworks pottery studio that benefits Moveable Feast, which provides meals to local people living with HIV/AIDS; and one for the Race for the Cure, which benefits research into breast cancer, which killed Heathcoat’s mother.

Other events have focused on disaster relief, such as Bow to the Brow day last March that honored University of Kentucky basketball player Anthony Davis and raised money for Eastern Kentucky tornado recovery.

“Some of our very best customers came here for the first time for a charity event,” Heathcoat said. “We just can’t believe more businesses don’t do this.”

Beyond growing their business, though, Pieratt and Heathcoat think community support is simply the right thing to do.

“We opened on seven credit cards and $10,000 I borrowed from my brother,” Heathcoat said. “If it wasn’t for this neighborhood, we wouldn’t have made it. Our philosophy from day one has been that the community supported us so we have a responsibility to give back.”

Wyn Morris, owner of The Morris Book Shop, feels that sense even more acutely. His father, lawyer Leslie Morris, was among the 49 people killed when Comair Flight 5191 crashed on takeoff from Blue Grass Airport on Aug. 27, 2006.

“Lexington truly came through for all of us,” said Morris, who opened his bookstore two years later and decided to put community engagement at the core of his business plan. “I just realized I hadn’t done much of anything for the community. It was a kind of a wake-up call.”


Lexington’s last hardware store survives on customer service

August 27, 2012

Bill Edwards, left, owner of Chevy Chase Hardware, helps Bill Mallory, who lives in Harrison County but stopped in on his way to a fishing trip to get a few nuts and lock washers. Mallory said he has been shopping with Edwards since he opened his first hardware store on Centre Parkway in 1975. Photos by Tom Eblen 

 

When Bill Edwards opened his first hardware store 37 years ago, Lexington was a small city with more traditional hardware stores than he could count on both hands.

Now Lexington is much bigger, but Edwards needs only one finger to count them. He says his Chevy Chase Hardware is the last one.

Ace Hardware in Tates Creek Center closed this spring, followed recently by Do it Best Hardware in Palomar Center. Others disappeared years ago. High rent and competition from big-box chains have taken their toll.

In fact, Edwards thinks his business would have been history 12 years ago had he not moved to East High Street from Richmond Road, where he had been for 20 years. Within months of each other, Home Depot and Lowe’s opened stores near his.

“We might have been able to survive one of them, but not two,” Edwards said. “We work with a much smaller profit margin than most businesses because we carry a large inventory of slow-selling items.”

Edwards said his store has always done well in the Chevy Chase building, which earlier housed hardware stores run by Wilson Cox and Dick Botkin. The area of small, mostly local retailers is an easy drive, walk or bike ride from in-town neighborhoods such as Chevy Chase, Ashland Park, Hollywood, Columbia Heights, Mentelle and Kenwick.

“This is a unique neighborhood, very supportive of local businesses,” Edwards said. “That’s a different attitude than we had at the other locations. It’s almost like being in another town.”

But Edwards credits his success to more than location. He said other keys to operating a good hardware store are selection, competitive prices and, most of all, customer service. At Chevy Chase Hardware, that includes everything from fixing lawn mowers and screens to sharpening tools, cutting glass and copying keys.

“Everybody’s so friendly,” said Debbie Chamblin, who usually walks over with her dog from her home on Ashland Avenue. One morning last week, she came in to buy a few things and pick up hedge trimmers she had left for sharpening.

“Just anything you need, they’re ready and willing to help you,” Chamblin said. “They’ll even help me fix things.”

Bill Mallory has been shopping with Edwards since he opened his first store on Centre Parkway in 1975.

“The nice thing here is you just tell the people what you need and they go right to it and get it for you,” said Mallory, who now lives in Harrison County but stopped in for a few nuts and lock washers on his way to fish.

Edwards stocks more than 20,000 items in his 4,400 square feet of retail space, which has been expanded several times since the first hardware store opened there in 1946. He carries many hard-to-find items.

“If it’s a slow-moving item that doesn’t generate a lot of profit, they just won’t carry it,” he said of his big-box competitors.

Because his store is part of a national buying group, Edwards said, he can match most competitors’ prices, except for some big-ticket items.

“We check Lowe’s and Home Depot to make sure we are in line,” he said. “Sometimes we’re actually less than they are. We can’t compete on everything, but we can certainly keep it reasonable enough to not offend anybody.”

Hands-on management is key. Edwards works the floor six days a week, constantly straightening shelves when he isn’t helping customers. His wife and co-owner, Carol, a former elementary school teacher, manages the office. They will celebrate their 40th wedding anniversary in February.

Chevy Chase Hardware has 11 employees, many of whom are college students or recent graduates. And then there is Luther Hilliard, 87, a longtime employee who now works a couple of days a week repairing screens.

“I don’t know what I would do if I just had to sit around and not work,” said Hilliard, who retired from the insurance business. “There’s nothing on TV.”

Edwards said he thought for years about opening a store on Leestown Road around Meadowthorpe, an area with qualities similar to Chevy Chase, but he could never find an affordable place to buy or rent. High rents are a big reason many hardware stores have closed in Lexington but remain in surrounding towns.

“We’re fine if we can keep our rent under control,” said Edwards, 63, who has tried unsuccessfully to buy his building. “We have seven years left on the lease, and I might be ready to quit by then.”

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